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The Terminator: A Film with B Movie Charm

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

In the year 2029 and a war rages on between man and machine. Following a nuclear holocaust instigated by Skynet, a computer defence system that had become part of the infrastructure of society and had grown so advanced that it became ‘self-aware’ and turned on its creators and the whole of mankind. The human survivors now do battle against their …

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Halloween 1978: The Legacy of a Horror Classic

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

Halloween remains the high-water mark for many a horror film, and can even make the claim to be the origin of the term coined ‘slasher movie’ among its many influences. The film opens with the main protagonist Michael Myers as a 6-year-old on Halloween night in the fictional town of Haddonfield, Illinois in 1963 who slays his elder sister and …

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Blade Runner: The Slow Burn of a Cult Classic

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

‘More human than a human is our motto’ Dr. Eldon Tyrell It would be fair to say that Blade Runner could be considered a slow burn in movie land. Regarded as a disappointment, moreover, a complete disaster on its release in 1982, with very few people fully understanding its overall premise. However, against the odds it has since gained cult …

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The Eurovision Song Contest: One of Life’s Guilty Pleasures

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

The Eurovision Song Contest was intended to be a platform to showcase the very best musical talent that Europe has to offer, and is now the longest-running annual TV competition ever since its launch in 1956. In the UK at least, it is now widely regarded as an eclectic mix of musical styles, a sort of retro-pop meets Eurotrash, and …

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Mad Max: Where it all Began

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

Directed by George Miller and produced on a budget of just an estimated 400,000 Australian dollars, or 350,000 US dollars, Mad Max was the archetypal comic book adventure tale, and the standout movie of its kind in 1979. Set in a dystopian future, a post-apocalyptic world of lawlessness and anarchy on the highways, Max Rockatansky is a highly respected traffic …

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The Omen: Intense Psychological Horror with Depth

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

The Omen, released in 1976 managed to create an indelible impact on the horror genre. Starring movie veterans Gregory Peck and Lee Remick, with Harvey Spencer Stevens as Damien, they are the unsuspecting couple who find their idyllic lives turned upside down by a decision that was to prove fatal. The film opens with Peck, an American diplomat, arriving at …

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How Pulp Fiction Laid Claim to Becoming one of the Great Movie Game Changers

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

In the first scenes of Pulp Fiction, released in 1994 and regarded as a classic of world cinema, and which placed its director Quentin Tarantino firmly on the map, we are introduced to a couple of hit men, Jules Winnfield and Vincent Vega who arrive at a dingy L.A. apartment sent by their boss, Marsellus Wallace, tasked with tracking down …

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Remembering a Reluctant Hollywood Star

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

The 1960’s was a decade that heralded a new wave of film stars such as Paul Newman, Sydney Poitier, Audrey Hepburn, Clint Eastwood and many others. But for a twist of fate, one actor may well have ranked amongst such prestigious talent had he not made the decision to forgo his acting career whilst on the verge of international stardom. …

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Gone but Forever Frozen in Time

In Film and Television by Critical Eye

Terry Sue-Patt, the former child star of British TV show Grange Hill was found dead in his flat in Walthamstow, a district in the North-East of London, on May 22nd. The 50-year-old who had reportedly developed a drink problem had been there for up to a month, although the exact cause of death has yet to be established. As Benny …